The Northern Lights

(The Anti-Equinox Aurora!)


June 18, 2003

A Magical Moment

When I took this photograph, it was a magical moment. The light of dawn was in sharp contrast with the northern lights, and the bright moon lit up the entire scene. It was comfortable out, with no wind - and virtually no mosquitoes. And bright Mars could be seen near the moon to the southeast. Looking east.

Looking northwest.

Looking east.

A corona.  My scanner (Epson Perfection 1660 Photo) read this as a black and white photograph and I don't know how to change the settings to make it scan color. I've got time to learn. Obviously looking overhead.

Looking northeast.

Looking east. My last photograph of the morning. FYI, this photograph (and the next) were taken using Kodak's new High Definition print film, 400 speed. I'm going to try it a couple of more times. I believe it has some potential for northern lights photography - but I want to try a couple more shows using it.

This is my only photograph that was taken with an 85 mm lens with a 2.0 aperature.  I took this photograph - looking northwest - at about 12:20 a.m. I noted some purple in the bottom of the curtains and wanted to capture it with this lens. Unfortunately, I wasn't ready and had to scramble and didn't do a good job. Next time I will be ready. I believe that the 85 mm lens will be useful to capture substorms near the northern horizon.

Looking east.

Looking southeast. The northern lights, mars and the moon. My next lesson in astrophotography has to be to learn how to take such a photograph without having all the lens flare. This also showed up on some other photographs. 

Looking northeast.

Looking east.

Looking east-southeast.

The big dipper - looking northwest.

Looking east-northeast.

Looking east.

A corona overhead.

Looking northwest.

Looking northwest.

Looking east.

Looking north.

Looking east-southeast.

Looking east-southeast.

And just in case ya thought that North Dakota isn't that pretty, consider that a number of these photographs were taken the afternoon of June 18 - and the rest on the morning of June 14.

Left - June 14 - early morning clouds. Right - June 18 - Prairie Rose.

Left - June 18 - Blanket Flower. Right - June 18 - Pincushion Cactus.

Left - June 14 - Large-Flowered Beard Tongue. Right - June 14 - Wild blue flax.

Left - June 18 - Tiger Swallowtail. Right - June 18 - Blister Beetle.

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